TGRWT #21 / Red Beet Salad with Sage and Roasted Peanuts

Red Beet Salat with Sage and Roasted Peanuts tgrwt21

To all spouses and partners, family and friends, who have put up with the air being constantly full of roasted peanuts and sage aromas, soon the air will be clear again. But before that, I have one more try to account for.

I did feel inspired in different ways. When you get the assignment of experimenting with any possibilities involving the tastes of sage and roasted peanuts, you notice how immense the culinary field is. You may go with something sweet, which does bring up various sweetness possibilities: honey, white sugar, brown sugar, muscovado sugar – just to mention a few. Considering something spicy you may want something salty, very salty – like it is usual with roasted peanuts –, or just a strong taste with very little, or no salt at all. And then the most challenging question: should it be a soup, a salad, fish, pasta, vegetables with rice, with potatoes, with couscous? Cooked vegetables? Raw?

There are mostly two ways most people might go. Either with the challenge of something totally new, or with adapting sage and roasted peanuts to the things they traditionally do and know. And since red beets have been an important ingredient in my coffee kitchen for the passed 4 years, at some point this possibility came to mind. Not an easy task, though. Red beets are known mostly as these red slices in cans which have been cooked and swim in a juice. This is a very strong vegetable and I assume that is the reason, why that variation is so common. Another variation is cooking them long enough to make them soft and lightly digestible. After all, it has been used in earlier days by the Romans as a cure for constipation and in the modern world of medicine as a laxative. But being that I also like very much using vegetables in their raw state, I mostly grate the beets and serve small portions. That also helps to ease the work of the mastication process and their wonderful earthy taste its preserved.

This is the first time I take part in this TGRWT project and have no idea how others approach such an experiment. From the beginning on my question was: how can I transport these roasted peanuts and sage tastes at its best? Which further ingredient could carry their taste well without taking too much away from them? Which ingredient serves well as a carrier while also giving a fine and descent note of its own? Red Beets are able to do a good job as supporters with a descent note of themselves.

Well, I doubt much I will be using peanuts in my kitchen more than I did before and I do believe I will stick to my peanut butter cinnamon shakes and to my toast with peanut butter and honey in the future, but I was pleased with the results of my Red Beet Salad with Sage and roasted Peanut, for which you take:

  • 1 medium-sized Red beet
  • About 15 sage leaves / 5-7  roasted shortly on the pan, the rest chopped and raw
  • 1/2 cup of roasted peanuts
  • 3 spoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon coffee (mocca roast is fine)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Grind the peanuts corse in a mortar. Not to fine, not too coarse. It is a matter of taste.

Grate the Red Beet.

Warm up the olive oil and add the raw chopped sage leaves, the coffee, some salt and some pepper to it. The olive oil should not get hot, just warm enough to give more of its aroma and help the sage and coffee give some of theirs as well.

I used this oil as the dressing, after sprinkling the roasted peanuts on top of the grated red beets. It is not everyone’s taste, but I like using the fine peanut coats – for decoration and for their bitterness.

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